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Installation

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General

Install Grok on MS Windows
How-to ; Versions: 1.1
This HowTo gives instructions for installing Grok on the various flavours of MS Windows. Please note that this HowTo is a _WORK IN PROGRESS_ during the alpha releases of Grok version 1.0 and grokproject version 1.0. TBD denotes To Be Discussed/Determined/Developed/Described/Done
Set custom configurations on a system level that your application can use
How-to for Developer, Server Administrators
Certain properties are best stored persistently inside your application. Other properties are more appropriate to store on a "system" level.

Deployment

Using Virtualenv for a clean Grok installation
How-to
NOTE: As of Grok 1.2, you do not need to use virtualenv. Grok is automatically isolated from the system python environment.
Grok, Virtual Hosting and Nginx
How-to
Configuring the super fast and lightweight Nginx HTTP server to support virtual hosting.
How to internationalize your application
How-to for Developer
In this howto, you will learn how to internationalize your code, extract translatable strings and translate your application into an other language.
How to pack your ZODB database
How-to for Developer, Server Administrators
The ZODB grows with each write operation. In order to reduce the size of the data.fs file, you need to perform a "pack" operation.
Installing and setting up Grok under mod_wsgi
Tutorial for Server Administrators; Versions: 1.0
Grok can run behind any WSGI server. This tutorial will show how to install Grok behind the Apache web server and mod_wsgi on a brand new Linux virtual server.
Placing your Grok project under version control
How-to for Developer, Advanced Developer
Which files to keep and which to throw away when you save your Grok project.
Selecting the port and interface where Grok listens
How-to for Developer, Server Administrators
By default, your Grok instance will listen for any incoming TCP connection destined for port 8080 on your machine. Here's how to choose a different port, or to select a particular interface on which it should accept connections.
Use Apache HTTP server with Grok (on Debian Sid)
How-to
This Grok How-To gives a step-by-step explanation of how to install and configure Apache HTTP server version 2.2 on Debian Sid to serve Grok Web Applications using the mod_rewrite method.

Development

Combine grokproject with the SVN trunk version of Grok
How-to for Advanced Developer; Versions: 0.12
You want to use grokproject to set up a development environment but you also want to develop with the latest and greatest from the SVN trunk. We'll show how to do that.
Eggs, Known Good Sets and developing with unreleased Grok source code
How-to for Developer
Grok releases are distributed as Python eggs. This gives you the flexibility to easily control what versions of each of the individual python packages that are used to make up a Grok application. Learn why this is a desirable goal, and how you can use this to develop your Grok application based on unreleased versions of Grok checked out from subversion.
Graphical debugging of Grok with Komodo IDE
How-to for Developer
Set up the Komodo IDE graphical debugger for your Grok project.
Install multiple Grok apps using zc.buildout
How-to ; Versions: 1.1
Grok is packaged as Python eggs. zc.buildout is a tool for managing these eggs, and let's you quickly try out or develop a Grok-based project.
Introduction to zc.buildout
Tutorial
Jim Fulton's tutorial for using buildout, originally given at DZUG 2007
Make use of add-ons via eggs
How-to for Developer, Advanced Developer
How to include additional third-party code packaged as eggs (using megrok.form as the example).
Placing your Grok project under version control
How-to for Developer, Advanced Developer
Which files to keep and which to throw away when you save your Grok project.
Profiling Grok - or: what does my application do in the afternoon?
How-to for Developer, Advanced Developer; Versions: 1.0a1
This How-To explains how you can profile your Grok application or Grok/Zope itself. This way you get an idea of the bottlenecks of your application or in other words: where it spends its time.
Selecting the port and interface where Grok listens
How-to for Developer, Server Administrators
By default, your Grok instance will listen for any incoming TCP connection destined for port 8080 on your machine. Here's how to choose a different port, or to select a particular interface on which it should accept connections.